The Professionals Choice
Architectural Sheet Metal Artisans
Serving Vancouver Island and the lower mainland since 1998

TAMURA BUILDING HERITAGE RESTORATION

The Tamura House's heritage value can be summarized as follows: Built in 1912/13, it is a significant early Japantown building which contributes to the intact urban character of the Powell Street facades in the sub area of Japanese Village of the Downtown- Eastside/Oppenheimer district area, dating, for the most part, from 1905 to 1938, Designed by Townsend and Townsend in an exuberant Edwardian Commercial Style, incorporating elaborate and overstated roof top cornices, pediments and applied columns, and the use of massive urn elements as likely Japanese cultural influences, As a surviving example of a number of speculative mixed-use blocks constructed on Powell Street and other areas of Japantown just prior to the collapse of the City's building boom in 1913. The building is currently registered in the Vancouver Heritage Registry as an A resource Articulation of its upper fa├žade, including detailed the buff face brick, pattern of fenestration on the first, second and third floors of large punched window openings with projecting concrete sills, elaborate bracketed projecting sheet metal cornice, applied three storey high sheet metal columns with Corinthian Style capitals, large ornate end brackets on Powell and Dunlevy Streets, and elaborate bases to the set of corner columns at Dunlevy and Powell, Surviving storefront elements including the lower sheet metal cornice with brackets relating to the upper cornice, elaborate ornamental gabled pediments over the corner suite entry and three more over the corner suite Dunlevy Street windows, original dressed granite cladding at corner of Dunlevy and Powell Streets, chamfered granite storefront bases at all storefront entries, surviving clearstorey windows and glazing on the Dunlevy storefronts, surviving alcove tile surfaces at all of the storefront entries, except the corner unit, as well as at the hotel entry, rock faced granite base masonry stepping up Dunlevy beneath the Corner suite units, and original wood fixed windows on the Dunlevy elevation of the corner suite, Surviving interior features including the subway tile with ornamental cap wainscot of the hotel entry and the surviving pressed tin ceiling in the corner unit, Evidence of advances in functional design, including the provision of natural light with skylights and open light courts, central heating, and bathrooms;
CONSTRUCTING NEW ROOFTOP URNS FROM DRAWINGS
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RE-CREATING AN IMPORTANT HERITAGE
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